About Tim

In the fall of 1963 Tim Wells was born in Canton, Illinois and raised as a farm boy. His family’s passion revolved around the outdoors, so his heritage laid the platform for an outdoor career that would evolve into legendary events.

At an early age he began bow hunting and became infatuated with the flight of the arrow. As a young lad his grandfather would look on for hours as Tim would shoot flue after flue after flue into the air. Tim was memorized at their flight. Instinctively he began to master his lead on moving game. It wasn’t long before he was killing flying birds and running rabbits. And it was apparent to those around him that his hunting savvy was special especially to his best friend, his grandpa Archie.

Archie fed Tim’s ambition and nurtured his growth as a hunter by teaching him the way of animals.

Standing in his grandpa’s back yard at fifteen years of age, Tim was shooting walnuts off a tree while his grandpa looked on. A flock of Canadian geese were passing overhead. Tim took the lead and released with the arrow cutting the distance then neatly picking the leader from the flock. The goose tumbled then fell from flight crashing into Archie’s grape harbor. Tim turned and smiled at his grandpa. Archie dearly loved Tim and he smiled back knowing he had molded a boy into a deadly bow hunter.

By the time Tim had graduated from high school he had become consistently successful hunting whitetails and the wild turkey. As a part time grave digger, he invested his money primarily on arrows and broad heads. It was soon after that when the family farm had been logged. To his father’s surprise, the loggers inquired as to why there were dozens of arrows growing out of the oak trees. Tim had left the farm but throughout his young childhood he shot hundreds of squirrels from the trees and obviously missed many more but hit or miss Tim left his mark. Soon after high school he picked up his first compound bow and began to reach farther prey then he had ever imagined possible. He continued to shoot instinctively with bare fingers. Whitetail numbers were now ballooning and hunting big bucks became his primary focus.

Throughout college Tim would hunt before and after class. His fraternity relied on Tim to provide game for outdoor barbecues which was an assortment of whatever had crossed within range that week. During college, Tim’s love of the arrow in flight had broadened into throwing the javelin which paid his way through school and began another hunting infatuation, the spear.

After college Tim began a successful environmental consulting firm that afforded him time afield. Now travelling the world, he hunted animals that were exotic to him. It came easy after growing up hunting the squirrel and whitetail. He wrote of his many experiences delighting thousands of readers. As he began to write of his hunts, his articles were published in North America’s leading hunting magazines.

Soon after Relentless Pursuit, his whitetail story book was released.

Still a young man, Tim had killed dozens of big game animals including 200 inch whitetail giants. But to Tim it seemed less challenging and he set his sights on finding greater hunting challenges. Bow hunting predators, Coues deer and water foul to name a few. Then one day it all changed when he carried a camera into the woods. A fresh challenge emerged and a portrait of his relentless pursuit was about to be born. A grizzly dropped stone dead soon after with an arrow stuck squarely between its eyes, ducks fell from the sky and squirrels fell from the trees. He killed whitetail from the ground and predator called a lion to within bow range. Then came the humor and a bumble bee was shot from flight.

Relentless Pursuit was born and so was Tim’s prodigy.

Today, Tim continues his pursuit with his son Clint and daughter Sydnie. His lovely wife Kerrie is the pillar that holds the family together and keeps Tim as close to home as possible. Together they share their passion for bow hunting with millions of viewers. Tim’s sense of fun and light heartedness is sometimes questioned by skeptics earning him the title of “Bow Hunting’s Bad Boy”. What he says and how he shoots often makes his sponsor’s squirm, but always leaves his audience wanting more. He’s a character and not concerned with being politically correct that’s for sure, but with Tim what you see is what you get. On screen he’s a prankster, funny but humble, and happily loving of wild animals. If a stranger shared camp with Tim, they’d never know he’s a giant among hunters, unless by chance, a flock of geese passed by.